Overtime 033-050 – I give up!!

Getting late. Wanted to finish posting these. But it’s not going to happen today unless I do it this way. So I think the final tally will be: 150 bee shots, 10 or so bonus (quasi-) pollinator shots, and one beebaby iris shot.

Here are the rest of ’em:

Rude one on a Semp – those mandibles!!!! Stuff of nightmares?
Sweat Bee on a Hyacinth
And the Liatris…
Beeneck…and those eyes.
Oh, those pollen buckets!
Brown-belted on a Sunflower…again
Escaping the Tulip
The Cone Flower rides again…or maybe…it’s the one being ridden?
Not Quite the Last Aster
Great face on that huntii
Tiny, tiny, tiny one with two tulips.
The last of the sedums
Approaching the Liatris to reload
The last Russian Sage
The last Cone Flower
Hard to believe, but the last aster. It also occurs to me that everyone will be viewing this backward to how I posted it. So prepare yourself – many more asters to follow!
Fantastic Agastache
The last of the last of the last – from the third swarm (May 2020). Phew!!
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Bee 080 – Honeybee on a Liatris

I’m really surprised that more of this flower didn’t show up. I had to reject a few that were too dark, but I have so many neat shots of all kinds of bees and other pollinators on this one. Maybe I was in the wrong folders…

Anyhow, check out that pollen bucket…and its color. You’d think the pollen from this one would be purple. But it’s not – it’s white-ish. And she’s laden.

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Yesterday’s Bee – on a Meadow Blazing Star

Another from the family Megachilidae – on a Meadow Blazing Star

Liatris ligulistylis – as noted, an amazing flower for attracting pollinators. Here’s the same species (unknown) from yesterday. I love the detail on face and eye.

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Filthy Bumble on a Meadow Blazing Star

Bumble on a Meadow Blazing Star (Liatris ligulistylis)

The Meadow Blazing Star (Liatris ligulistylis) is an incredible plant for attracting pollinators. I look forward to it blooming every year. The pollen mess all over that bumble is Liatris pollen. White, not purple. Seems odd to me, but what do I know? This variety gets pretty tall – up to five feet. And when it blooms (late summer/early fall), it’s just covered with blossoms – nearly bottom to top. My only criticism of the thing is it moves some even in the slightest breeze – and it’s tough enough finding a bee that will hold still… 😉

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