Leafcutter and Wing Shadow

It tickles me – delights me – when I find pictures of the shadows of bees’ wings. Or a bee shadow on petals when the bee is in flight. When you write or draw with light (photo (light) graph (to draw or write)), literally, the shadows are such an important part of the whole. This isn’t a great example of shadows as part of the broader composition…but it’s neat for me to see. And the bee looks great. Those eyes!

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Black and Grey Leafcutter on the Larkspur

This one had just landed. Got several nice shots in flight that will show up later. The light’s a little strange, but the bee looks fantastic. That coloration is something I rarely see. Still has the neat leafcutter eyes, though. The yellow in the background is a mess of blanket flowers. Because the larkspur is so tall and otherwise unsupported (single stalks), it’s often hard to get a clear shot. That wind and all. But this one worked out well…especially the wings.

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Russian Sage with a Sleeping Leafcutter

More on the neighbors’ Russian Sage. I remember this morning. This little leafcutter was just immobile. Troubling because sometimes the bee has just given up the ghost (or been stung or otherwise damaged). This one, however, was just resting before the sun crested the mountain. And I got a number of good shots. So much easier when they’re holding still ;). Love the eye…and the colors on this little one. And, of course, the Russian Sage is just made for interesting bokeh.

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Finally…a Leafcutter…on Lavender

First, I think I’ve got the lease settled for a physical storefront/gallery. That’s exciting. Won’t be all bees, of course, but they will have prominent space.

Second, I got a few today that weren’t on the ‘mums. Here’s a leafcutter (that infamous “abdomen-up” bee) on the second bloom of the lavender. Some shadows, but I really had wondered if I’d had my last good bee day. Was a good one today. Easy to excuse the shadows.

Third, I might have figured out why I’m not much of a fan of chrysanthemums. First, it might be that after Memorial Day in the cemeteries, those in those foil-wrapped plastic pots look nasty and trashy. I realize that they don’t get the water/care that they need, but they strike me as cheap and temporary…and ultimately depressing. Second, they seem to be the cheap (that word again), go-to flower when you’re panicked and in the grocery store. Something that ubiquitous and inexpensive can’t have much value, right? Wow, that was more than any of you asked. Next step: love ’em for what they are. I’ve sure gotten some great pics on them. And they do serve the bees well.

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The Second of the Three-fer

A lefcutter this time. And an especially golden one, which again is rare in my experience. Love the eye on this one. The flower is looking a little ratty, but notice how it’s still showing and throwing pollen. Don’t deadhead these cone flowers until the bees start to ignore them. They’re kind of strange in that they keep opening up and sharing pollen long after the petals get nasty.

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Leafcutter Approaching the Yarrow

I’m in Durango, Colorado today at the art festival. If you’re in the area, come have a look!

This is the infamous “abdomen-up” bee. Seems like the underside of her back end is always covered in pollen. Great eyes on this one. Great grab. And the pink with the green background is special.

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The Cone Flower Again!

Seems I haven’t gotten as many shots this summer on the cone flowers. Not sure if it’s time of day, something else weird, or other plants throwing more/better pollen. There’s a magenta one I don’t think I’ve gotten a single shot on. Anyway, here’s a great leafcutter on an echinacea – and I never use that name because I can neither remember nor spell it. Cone flower. Or, because I misheard initially, corn flower. Which is another flower entirely. It’s early. I yammer. The abdomen-up bee.

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