Another Honeybee on another Crocus

The perils of the bees’ return

Seemed to be stuck on bumbles for a bit. Now it’s crocuses. Guess that’s because that’s what’s blooming. Shot this one on Feb. 28th. Love the spot of pollen on her eye.

Tulips started opening today. If they’re anything like last year’s early ones, it will be a few days and then they’ll be ready for the bees. Hoping to catch one just bathing in pollen…or find a shot from last year.

Ours should be back within a week or two.

Stormy with an occasional earthquake here today. No shooting. Hoping for better weather tomorrow.

Rate this photo

That Blue Pollen Bucket

Honeybee on a Siberian Squill (Scilla siberica)

Got lucky today being able to do what I mentioned yesterday – that is, find a bee on a Squill and show the blue pollen. Not the best pic of the flower, but if you look close, you can see that the pollen on the anthers is a neat blue color…and that she’s been harvesting it. Watch through the spring and the summer how the color (and size) of the pollen varies from flower to flower.

The honey we get from our foster hives is interesting, too. In the spring, it’s a very light amber. In the fall it’s dark…almost opaque. And has a different taste (both are fantastic).

A few more of this series coming later. I really enjoy that blue pollen.

Rate this photo

Another Spring Day…

Honeybee on a Crocus

…another honeybee on a crocus. Lots of other things starting, too. Daffs…but they’re not all that great for bee shots. Tulips will be along soon. It’s truly starting – finally again.

Oh, the squills are neat. I’ll try to get a deep purple/nearly navy blue pollen bucket if I can soon. Don’t know how they get so full with such tiny flowers.

Anyway, this is supposed to be about crocuses (rivers of crocuses here), and I’m wandering off. Think it’s late.

Enjoy this one. Love the pollen on her.

Rate this photo

Honeybee Drinking on an Iris

Honeybee Drinking on an Iris

It’s pretty rare to get a bee shot on an iris. At least around here. Not sure why, but they’re not that great for pollinators. That said, they’re far and away my favorite flower. Something about them…

This is a neat one in that you can see her drinking. Was shot by thebeegal last spring.

Rate this photo

Honeybee in October

Honeybee shot in October

I’ve been long on bumbles lately, so here’s a honeybee shot in October at Ogden Botanical Gardens. I don’t know what this flower is, but it’s one of the last ones to keep blooming…even through moderate frosts. As fall winds down, the bees have fewer sources to use. Somehow these that bloom late have become some of my favorites.

A season and a time and a purpose…

Rate this photo

Honeybee on a Sedum

Kind of mailing this one in. I think the picture is fantastic. It’s a creamy variant of a sedum – with bee neck, much like the Feb 1 post from this year. Mid-afternoons until the dusk, the honeybees just flock to these. They’re late-season bloomers around here and it’s the honeybees that seem to be the most attracted to them. They’re neat flowers in their own right.

Rate this photo

Honeybee on a Dahlia

Honeybee on a Dahlia to which the grasshoppers got first

This is the first in a long series of bees on imperfect flowers (this one having been ravaged by grasshoppers). One of the basic tenets of photography, I’m told, is to pick the best examples of your subjects (and backgrounds) that you can. For this site, I’m not sure I agree. Not only because it’s primarily about the bees (and it is), but also for a couple of other, related reasons.

First, there’s beauty to be found all the way through the cycle. This deserves more than a single sentence (and maybe I’ll yammer about it sometime), but it’s just true. And not only because it’s part of the cycle – but because the beauty is inherent.

Second, there are some who manicure their gardens – they “deadhead” the moment a blossom is past its prime – or if the blossom is damaged. That’s one point of view. And I’ll not argue with it. But I will point out that the bee doesn’t give even a single, half-a-damn that the flower looks torn up. There’s pollen there – there’s energy there – there are winter stores there… And she’s hard at work on this particular wreck of a blossom.

It’s really more than just “the eye of the bee(badpun)holder”. It’s real. It’s what’s for dinner.

Rate this photo

Another Crocus Day

Honeybee in the Crocuses

It’s supposed to start storming here tomorrow. But today…today the girls were out again in the crocuses. I love this time of year. Not much more to say other than that I’m thrilled to see the cycle starting anew…again.

Well, and that I feel bad not getting in closer to the pollen-eyed little one. But the crocuses…they deserve some love, too.

In other news – second month of bees.photo starting today. Mini-milestone.

Rate this photo

The Girls are Back!!!!

First bee of spring – with pollen on her eye – on a Crocus tommasinianus ‘Roseus’

Finally!! I took our traveling bus down to the garage to get it worked on, and a friend from there drove me back to the house. As we pulled into the driveway, I saw (on a south-facing slope) several honeybees at work in the newly-blooming crocuses. The conversation stopped abruptly and I got out of the car and sprinted to the house for my camera. Don’t know if I even thanked him for the ride home.

Got some reasonable shots, but the joy… Spring is coming. Bees are back at work. Things are good!

For the record, that crocus is a Crocus tommasinianus ‘Roseus’

Rate this photo