Filthy One in the Basil

Rate this photo

Of all the strange things. But…if you’ve got herbs, check for bees. They just love them. On this day in July, I must have seen a dozen varieties of bees in the neighbors’ basil (and mint, I think), at least that many varieteis of wasps, and the odd spider and butterfly. Was a great day and place to be a pollinator.

This is a nice one of a honeybee looking right at you. Pretty.

Another Wool Carder in the Larkspurs

Rate this photo

Similar shot to the one I posted the other day. Love the background, the eye, and the antennae. Not sure what it thought it was doing on the bud because it’s obviously not throwing pollen, but… Those wool carder bees are a little weird anyway. Might have been resting a minute and ensuring that nobody was entering his territory. Who knows. But he’s sure a good looking bee! (And yes, I think this one’s a male. They’re a little bigger…and they’re the aggressive, territorial ones.)

Looks Like a Wool Carder Bee in the Sedum

Rate this photo

This is a pretty neat ground cover. Doesn’t bloom all that perceptably or all that long. But it does its job well and it’s not a water pig. Another thing I like about it is that while it covers well (and quickly), it isn’t awful to remove when it strays (as a good ground cover is wont to do). Plus the wool carder bees really like it. Awful little buggers, those bees. Aggressive to other bees (not humans) and territorial…and never hold still long enough. But I’m fond of them for being who they are. Anyway…spring will spring soon…and new photos to be had then.

Leafcutter and Wing Shadow

Rate this photo

It tickles me – delights me – when I find pictures of the shadows of bees’ wings. Or a bee shadow on petals when the bee is in flight. When you write or draw with light (photo (light) graph (to draw or write)), literally, the shadows are such an important part of the whole. This isn’t a great example of shadows as part of the broader composition…but it’s neat for me to see. And the bee looks great. Those eyes!

A Standby: Sublime Longhorn in a Sunflower

Rate this photo

The longhorns are so partial to the sunflowers. And they’re such complex, hairy-looking things. Have so many shots of them that are similar to this. And most of them give the same feeling. There’s an easy smoothness looking at them. They’re all different – and this one is great if only for the green background. Nice combination of colors and shapes – even composition is interesting. And, of course, the bee looks great.

In the Ratty Alyssum

Rate this photo

This alyssum has been at it for a while. You can see the seed pods to the left and right of that bunch of blossoms that the bee is visiting. Also in the lower right corner. Good shot of the bee and her wings – those veins. This plant is classified as an annual, and it is. But it is a little like a perennial in that it keeps showing up each year – it seeds itself (as evidenced by this shot). It doesn’t wander much, but the color (owing to the bees’ good work) can morph through time.

We generally end up planting a flat or two here and there, but there’s always a great crop of volunteers there and here, too. This one is kind of tricky for bees because sometimes it’s just bare…and on other days it’s pulsing with bees. With some plants, I can kind of tell where in the pollen cycle they are and predict rightly when the bees will be on it. Haven’t really figured this one out – and it’s somewhat strange because each plant – each bunch – usually has so many blossoms that some ought to be throwing pollen. But it seems an all-or-nothing thing for the bees.

Larkspur Bud and Wool Carder Bee

Rate this photo

This one isn’t a native, but from the UK, I think. Really aggressive, territorial little thing. And…as they might say in the UK, rather randy. And annoying. That said, it’s a beautiful bee. Not much to not like about its aesthetics. Great look at the eye today. And the background really makes this shot interesting. Nice feel to it.